English

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The study of English is crucial to the development of every student’s education at The John Lyon School. The Year 7 curriculum is exciting and diverse, offering opportunities to explore many different types of writing and to develop students’ individual creative skills. These opportunities are underpinned by a rigorous emphasis on spelling, punctuation and grammar. Students will learn the importance of expressing their ideas with clarity and precision, whilst taking pride in the level of detail that they include in their written work.

The study of English in Year 8 provides an excellent platform for students to build on the skills that they are introduced to in Year 7. The syllabus offers opportunities for sophisticated analysis of literature, as pupils begin to hone their essay-writing skills in anticipation of IGCSE English. This emphasis on analysis is combined with exploration of creative writing and continued focus on the importance of independent reading.

Year 9 is a very important time for students to consolidate their skills in English as they prepare for IGCSE. They will study a wide range of genres, thereby familiarising students with literature from different time periods throughout history. They will develop their language skills through study of non-fiction and close attention to accurate use of spelling, punctuation and grammar. Creative writing and independent reading continue to play an important part in the curriculum.

Students will prepare for qualifications in English Literature and English Language. They will study poetry, prose and drama for the Literature qualification. Preparation for the English Language examination involves developing skills such as learning to write in different styles and for different audiences.

English Language and English Literature IGCSE are core components of the curriculum. A student’s performance in these qualifications will affect their academic future and their career. Universities and employers set minimum requirements for achievement in English, regardless of whether English relates directly to their chosen degree subject or career path. For example, many medical schools demand an A in English Language. Pupils must strive for high achievement in English in order to maximise the opportunities available to them in the future.

Students will prepare for qualifications in English Literature and English Language. They will study poetry, prose and drama for the Literature qualification. Preparation for the English Language examination involves developing skills such as learning to write in different styles and for different audiences.

The A-Level course involves the study of literary texts – novels, poetry and plays – from Chaucer to the modern day and is spread over two years.  Final Assessment is by two examinations and by coursework in the Upper Sixth.

English is respected by universities and employers because it is rigorous, helps to extend a pupil’s sympathetic imagination, and demands a sophisticated use of literacy. English can be studied alone at university or in combination with another subject, for example History or Theatre Studies. In Sixth Form, English compliments any other subject. It is often required by Medicine courses along with Sciences; makes a popular and useful course esteemed by Law conversion courses for aspiring barristers and solicitors; and provides the gateway for many creative degree subjects and respected professions.